The 39 Clues Wiki
Advertisement
The 39 Clues Wiki
Card 43: Bletchley Park
Number: 43
Branch: Lucian
Type: Location
Rarity: Common
Puzzle: Yes
Clue: No
Top Secret: Yes
Where To Get This Card: Card Pack 1


Description[]

"Bletchley Park, or Station X, was the British estate where a crack team of code breakers assembled to decipher Nazi war messages during WWII. The brilliant minds at Bletchley Park did the unthinkable--they beat the Nazi's Enigma encoder, thought to produce unbreakable code. The information coming out of Bletchley Park was so secret that those involved stayed quiet about it for decades after the war ended. But if the war was over, why so much secrecy? Could it be that there was another kind of spying going on at Bletchley Park? That's right--this has got Lucian written all over it."

How to Acquire[]

You can get this card along with Card 39, Card 53, Card 56, and Card 66 using the code TRUSTNOONE.

Puzzle[]

The answer to the puzzle is "Ekats have Amber Room."

Level: 3

Top Secret[]

Files on various Bletchley Park workers.

Stolen Archive file 43: Classified dossier on Bletchley Park's brightest minds

(photo is a silhouette with CONFIDENTIAL stamp on top)

DILLY KNOX

(fingerprint)

23 July, 1884 - 27 February, 1943

Classicist, Cryptanalyst

NOTE: Knox worked with language-based codes. After developing lymph cancer, he began working from home.

(photo of Alan Turing)

ALAN TURING

(fingerprint)

23 June, 1912 - 7 June, 1954

Mathematician, Logician, Cryptanalyst

NOTE: Turing was the head of German cipher analysis at Bletchley Park and cracked many codes until he was removed and put on probation for being gay.

(photo of Miriam Rothschild)

Miriam Rothschild

(fingerprint)

5 August, 1908 - 20 January, 2005

Zoologist, Entomologist, Cryptanalyst

NOTE: Rothschild was born wealthy and used her fame and money to get the British government to give more German Jews asylum during WWII.

(photo of Tommy Flowers)

Tommy Flowers

(fingerprint)

22 December, 1905 - 28 October, 1998

Mechanical and Electrical Engineer

NOTE: Flowers himself paid for much of the equipment for his code-breaking computer, the Colossus, because Bletchley Park management was not convinced it would work.

Advertisement